The 2008 Governor General's Medals in Architecture : And the winners are…
The 2008 Governor General's Medals in Architecture
And the winners are…
Donna Balkan + Sylvie Powell, May 19, 2008
The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) and the Canada Council for the Arts announces the recipients of the Governor General’s Medals in Architecture for 2008. “The creations of the twelve recipients of the Governor General’s Medal in Architecture make us appreciate the degree to which Canadian architects have transformed the places where we live, work, share culture and come together into a celebration of beauty and human genius,” said Her Excellency the Right Honourable Michaëlle Jean, Governor General of Canada. “All art forms contribute to improving our quality of life and the communities we live in, but architecture has a particularly immediate and direct impact on our surroundings,” said Simon Brault, Vice-Chair of the Canada Council for the Arts. “The outstanding buildings that are being honoured with this year’s Governor General’s Medals are a testament to the creativity, ingenuity and overall excellence of Canadian architects, and the Canada Council is proud to participate in the administration of this award.

ArchitectsAlliance_TerrenceTom Arban
ArchitectsAlliance_TerrenceTom Arban


“It is very encouraging to note that our educational, cultural and community institutions have embraced inspirational contemporary Canadian architecture,” said RAIC President Kiyoshi Matsuzaki, FRAIC. “This year’s winners include buildings for higher education, community and cultural centres, a church and a museum as well as two residences. The award-winning projects are indeed world-class and demonstrate that, as architects, we Canadians can create buildings that are second to none.”

Teeple Architects
Teeple Architects


The Governor General’s Medals in Architecture recognize outstanding achievement in recently built projects by Canadian architects. This program, created by the RAIC, contributes to the development of the discipline and practice of architecture, and increases public awareness of architecture as a vital cultural force in Canadian society. These awards are administered jointly with the Canada Council for the Arts, which is responsible for the adjudication process and contributes to the publication highlighting the medal winners. The 2008 Governor General’s Medals in Architecture recipients were selected by a jury of the following distinguished architects: Prof. Manfred Sabatke, (Stuttgart, Germany); Pina Petricone, MRAIC (Toronto); John McMinn (Toronto); Anne Cormier (Montréal); and Steve Christer (Reykjavik, Iceland).


Winnipeg Centennial Library Addition_Patkau / LM Architectural Group (Vancouver, BC_James Dow
Winnipeg Centennial Library Addition_Patkau / LM Architectural Group (Vancouver, BC_James Dow


Patkau Architects (Vancouver, BC) 
Lead Design Architects: John Patkau, FRAIC and 
Patricia Patkau, FRAIC

Winnipeg Centennial Library Addition


The Winnipeg Centennial Library is
a three-storey building that along with
a public park occupies a city block. Expanding the library into the park would have destroyed valuable green space. Thus most of the added space is contained in a new fourth floor. At the park edge, new elevators and a system of stairs and reading terraces tie existing floors to each other and to the new fourth floor. The glazed wall of this multistory space opens every level to light, landscape, and the city. All public and collections space is accessible from this route. The highly visible, interactive terraces generate a radically new identity for the library.


Winnipeg Centennial Library Addition_Patkau / LM Architectural Group (Vancouver, BC_James Dow
Winnipeg Centennial Library Addition_Patkau / LM Architectural Group (Vancouver, BC_James Dow


Gleneagles Community Centre

The Gleneagles Community Centre is located on a small, gently sloping site in West Vancouver, British Columbia. The program is organized on three levels to limit the building footprint. The lower two levels can each be accessible, at grade, on opposite sides of the building. The intermediate level contains a community “living room”, café, meeting room, administration, and child care and generous front porch along the street. The lower level, with gymnasium, multipurpose room, arts room and outdoor specialty area, opens to covered outdoor terraces and courtyard spaces adjacent to a public golf course. The upper level accommodates fitness facilities.

Gleneagles Community Centre_Patkau Architects (Vancouver, BC)_James Dow
Gleneagles Community Centre_Patkau Architects (Vancouver, BC)_James Dow


Gleneagles Community Centre_Patkau Architects (Vancouver, BC)_James Dow
Gleneagles Community Centre_Patkau Architects (Vancouver, BC)_James Dow


Communication, Culture and Technology Building_Saucier + Perrotte architectes (Montreal, QC)_Marc Cramer
Communication, Culture and Technology Building_Saucier + Perrotte architectes (Montreal, QC)_Marc Cramer


Saucier + Perrotte architectes (Montreal, QC)
Lead Design Architect: Gilles Saucier, FIRAC

Communication, Culture and Technology Building University of Toronto Mississauga

Located at the edge of the Campus, the new Communication, Culture and Technology Building assumes the role of an interface. Organized along the principal façade, the building is closely bordered by a park on one side and a new courtyard garden on the other. Its main circulation creates a linear public space that provides a line of connection between the Student Centre and the future library as well as between the landscape and the building’s public and educational spaces. CCT becomes a place of transition, adjacency and inhabitation all at once.


Communication, Culture and Technology Building_Saucier + Perrotte architectes (Montreal, QC)_Marc Cramer
Communication, Culture and Technology Building_Saucier + Perrotte architectes (Montreal, QC)_Marc Cramer


Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden Architects (Vancouver, BC) 
Lead Design Architect: Bruce Haden, MRAIC

Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre


The Nk’Mip Desert Culture Centre is a dramatic and sustainable response to its unique context - the Canadian desert south of the Okanagan Valley in Osoyoos, British Columbia. The building features indoor and outdoor exhibits that honour the cultural history of the Osoyoos Indian Band and are designed to be an extension of the remarkable site. The project’s ambitious approach towards sustainable design includes features such as the largest rammed earth wall in North America; the use of blue-stain pine; a habitable green roof; in-slab radiant cooling and heating; careful water-use management; and research space for the endangered rattlesnake.


Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre_Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden Architects (Vancouver, BC)_Nic Lehoux
Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre_Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden Architects (Vancouver, BC)_Nic Lehoux


Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre_Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden Architects (Vancouver, BC)_Nic Lehoux
Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre_Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden Architects (Vancouver, BC)_Nic Lehoux


Canada’s National Ballet School Project Grand Jeté_Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects & Goldsmith Borgal & Company Ltd. Architects, Architects in Joint Venture (Toronto, ON)_Tom Arban
Canada’s National Ballet School Project Grand Jeté_Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects & Goldsmith Borgal & Company Ltd. Architects, Architects in Joint Venture (Toronto, ON)_Tom Arban


Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects & Goldsmith Borgal & Company Ltd. Architects, Architects in Joint Venture (Toronto, ON)
 Lead Design Architects Bruce Kuwabara, FRAIC and
Phil Goldsmith, MRAIC

Canada’s National Ballet School Project Grand Jeté

The new training centre for Canada’s National Ballet School creates a vertical campus of three transparent elements composed around a historic residence. The concept fuses architecture, dance, and movement within a series of stacked, horizontal platforms (stages) to bring the spectacle of dance to the city. The thoughtful refinement of all elements, from the grand volumes of the studios to the customized ballet barres, reflects the School’s vision to cultivate innovation. As a model for the harmonious co-existence of heritage and contemporary architecture, the design offers a metaphorical resolution of the dilemma of contemporary ballet to both preserve and challenge its art form.


Canada’s National Ballet School Project Grand Jeté_Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects & Goldsmith Borgal & Company Ltd. Architects, Architects in Joint Venture (Toronto, ON)_Tom Arban
Canada’s National Ballet School Project Grand Jeté_Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects & Goldsmith Borgal & Company Ltd. Architects, Architects in Joint Venture (Toronto, ON)_Tom Arban


Le Groupe Arcop (Montreal, QC)
Lead Design Architect: Ramesh Khosla, FRAIC

Jaypee Institute of Information Technology

Jaypee Institute of Information Technology is a simple compact campus. The campus design criteria emerged from three scarce commodities in India, inordinate development trends, scarce land, expensive energy and low finances. The campus creates a value for their owners and establishes enduring physical assets that optimize life cycle costs. The special aesthetic of the campus is the residue that is left after you have walked through the spaces, a sense that you have been in a special place and some of its enthrallment has pattered on you. ARCOP has gathered a lot of experience working on the subcontinent and feels at home dealing with high end as well as very economic buildings.


Jaypee Institute of Information Technology_Le Groupe Arcop (Montreal, QC)_Eye Piece Photography & Design
Jaypee Institute of Information Technology_Le Groupe Arcop (Montreal, QC)_Eye Piece Photography & Design


Jaypee Institute of Information Technology_Le Groupe Arcop (Montreal, QC)_Eye Piece Photography & Design
Jaypee Institute of Information Technology_Le Groupe Arcop (Montreal, QC)_Eye Piece Photography & Design


House at 4a Wychwood Park_Ian MacDonald Architect Inc. (Toronto, ON)_Michael Awad
House at 4a Wychwood Park_Ian MacDonald Architect Inc. (Toronto, ON)_Michael Awad


Ian MacDonald Architect Inc. (Toronto, ON)
Lead Design Architect: Ian MacDonald, MRAIC

House at 4a Wychwood Park

This dwelling for a family with two children involved the replacement of a derelict 1950s bungalow, which sat awkwardly on its sloped site in the heritage-designated neighborhood of Wychwood Park in Toronto. Built within the limits of a prescribed building envelope, the design respects the arts-and-crafts character of the neighbourhood within a modernist idiom. The new dwelling virtually disappears into a newly carved landscape of dry-laid stone walls to create a series of “cozy open spaces” and a variety of spatial experiences: the horizontal, transparent feel of the dining room, the tall but internally focused study, and the double height, linear circulation space that joins them.


House at 4a Wychwood Park_Ian MacDonald Architect Inc. (Toronto, ON)_Michael Awad
House at 4a Wychwood Park_Ian MacDonald Architect Inc. (Toronto, ON)_Michael Awad


Moriyama & Teshima Architects (Toronto, ON) /
Griffiths Rankin Cook Architects (Ottawa, ON): in joint venture
Lead Design Architects: Raymond Moriyama, FRAIC and 
Alex Rankin, FRAIC

New Canadian War Museum

Regeneration embodies the sequences of devastation, rebirth and adaptation. War destroys nature and yet it regenerates as the power of life prevails: a process that rekindles faith and courage. Regeneration as a design concept was inspired by the deeds and stories of Canadian veterans. The New Canadian War Museum emerges from the bank of the Ottawa River, rising eastward to engage the cityscape and pay homage to the Parliamentary Precinct. The building expresses the ambiguities of war and sacrifice, the profound attachment we have to land and site, and that intangible quality that is integral to our identity as Canadians.


New Canadian War Museum_Moriyama & Teshima Architects (Toronto, ON)_Tom Arban
New Canadian War Museum_Moriyama & Teshima Architects (Toronto, ON)_Tom Arban


New Canadian War Museum_Moriyama & Teshima Architects (Toronto, ON)_Tom Arban
New Canadian War Museum_Moriyama & Teshima Architects (Toronto, ON)_Tom Arban


ROAR_one_Lang Wilson Practice in Architecture Culture Inc. (Lead Design Architect) and Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden Architects, Associated Architect_Nic Lehoux
ROAR_one_Lang Wilson Practice in Architecture Culture Inc. (Lead Design Architect) and Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden Architects, Associated Architect_Nic Lehoux


Lang Wilson Practice in Architecture Culture Inc. (Lead Design Architect) and Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden Architects, Associated Architect
Lead Design Architect: Oliver Lang, MRAIC

ROAR_one

The ROAR_one project is situated in Vancouver in the dynamic context of an emerging metropolis on the Pacific Rim. The world’s urban population will double from three to six billion by 2050 (U.N. estimate). Until then Metro Vancouver will add another 1.5 – 2.0 million residents. At the same time environmental concerns will continue to increase. For the dense and sustainable metropolis, it seems therefore imperative to develop housing models that address or counter urban sprawl, curb unnecessary commuting, catalyze entrepreneurial activities, address the issue of affordability and facilitate cultural and social inventiveness. The ambition for the ROAR_one project was to create a qualitative paradigm shift for dense urban living and live-work culture. The project is positioned through design innovation with regards to livability, flexibility, choice, sustainability, compactness and strategic spatial qualities.


ROAR_one_Lang Wilson Practice in Architecture Culture Inc. (Lead Design Architect) and Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden Architects, Associated Architect_Nic Lehoux
ROAR_one_Lang Wilson Practice in Architecture Culture Inc. (Lead Design Architect) and Hotson Bakker Boniface Haden Architects, Associated Architect_Nic Lehoux


Teeple Architects Inc. (Toronto, ON)
Lead Design Architect: Stephen Teeple

Scarborough Chinese Baptist Church

This new church and community centre has been conceived as a direct reflection of the liturgical vision of its Baptist congregation. This liturgical vision has a dual focus - fellowship, which the church characterizes as horizontal relationships between people, and spirituality, which is seen as a vertical relationship between people and God. The physical form and experience of the church directly reflect this vision. Horizontal roofs and views to the wood lot setting characterize the community wing, while soaring vertical forms that with an emphasis on natural light from above characterize the sanctuary.


Scarborough Chinese Baptist Church_Teeple Architects Inc. (Toronto, ON)_Shai Gil
Scarborough Chinese Baptist Church_Teeple Architects Inc. (Toronto, ON)_Shai Gil


Scarborough Chinese Baptist Church_Teeple Architects Inc. (Toronto, ON)_Shai Gil
Scarborough Chinese Baptist Church_Teeple Architects Inc. (Toronto, ON)_Shai Gil


Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and_architectsAlliance (Toronto, ON) & Behnisch Architekten (Stuttgart, Germany)_Tom Arban
Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and_architectsAlliance (Toronto, ON) & Behnisch Architekten (Stuttgart, Germany)_Tom Arban


architectsAlliance (Toronto, ON) & Behnisch Architekten (Stuttgart, Germany) - Lead Design Architects: Peter Clewes, MRAIC, Adrian DiCastri, and Stefan Behnisch

Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto

A slender, transparent 12-storey tower resting elegantly between adjacent heritage buildings is suspended above a new landscaped forecourt and concourse leading from College Street through to the heart of the campus. A five-storey glazed and planted atrium connecting to the adjacent heritage building, together with multi-storey “winter gardens” distributed on upper floors, creates a green and light-filled environment that completely transforms traditional ideas of lab buildings. The mix of amenity, flexibility and spatial connectivity, the “cool factor” of advanced sustainable design features, and the commitment to innovation implicit in a sophisticated contemporary architecture will enable the University to draw the world’s best and brightest research minds to the TDCCBR. Clarity and lightness clearly communicates the Centre’ s intentions to the rest of the academic community, and to the public at large. The TDCCBR is intended a symbol of openness and civic-mindedness. It provides an open, approachable home for a rapidly developing area of science about which the public knows little. It literally "renders science visible".


Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and_architectsAlliance (Toronto, ON) & Behnisch Architekten (Stuttgart, Germany)_Tom Arban
Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and_architectsAlliance (Toronto, ON) & Behnisch Architekten (Stuttgart, Germany)_Tom Arban


Teeple Architects Inc. and Shore Tilbe Irwin & Partners Architects, Architects in Joint Venture (Toronto, ON)
Lead Design Architect: Stephen Teeple, FRAIC

Trent University Chemical Sciences Building

The science centre is conceived as a promenade, both architectural and natural, that brings one into repeated contact with the Otonabee River, the central focus of Ron Thom’s Trent University campus. It is directly linked to the ground floor of the existing science precinct, and to its +15 circulation system. The promenade weaves between these two levels, presenting views of Trent’s unique river landscape to students as they move through the campus and the building. The river is the constant reference point, ever present in one’s experience of the place. The project provides a highly regularized, flexible system of teaching labs that can be combined, as required, into various research projects. The ordered nature of the spaces stands in contrast to the sculpted complexity of the public space as it reaches outward to the river.

The Governor General’s Medals in Architecture will be presented in October 16, 2008 at Rideau Hall by Her Excellency.


Teeple Architects Inc. and Shore Tilbe Irwin & Partners Architects, Architects in Joint Venture (Toronto, ON)_Tom Arban
Teeple Architects Inc. and Shore Tilbe Irwin & Partners Architects, Architects in Joint Venture (Toronto, ON)_Tom Arban


Trent University Chemical Sciences Building_Teeple Architects Inc. and Shore Tilbe Irwin & Partners Architects, Architects in Joint Venture (Toronto, ON)_Tom Arban
Trent University Chemical Sciences Building_Teeple Architects Inc. and Shore Tilbe Irwin & Partners Architects, Architects in Joint Venture (Toronto, ON)_Tom Arban