SEARCH
DESIGN CITIES
EGO MAGAZINE
ARCHIVES
Monsengwo Kejwamfi Moke : Father of the Popular painting movement in Congo
Monsengwo Kejwamfi Moke
Father of the Popular painting movement in Congo
Zateke Mbala, April 28, 2008
Monsengwo Kejwamfi, called Moke
Monsengwo Kejwamfi, called Moke
 
Moke was a painter reporter of city life. Considered the father of the Popular painting movement in Zaïre (the Democratic Republic of Congo), Moke arrived in Kinshasa in 1960, the Zaïre gained its independence from Belgium. As a 10-year-old orphan, he supported himself by painting landscapes of discarded pieces of cardboard. He eventually set up a studio in KInsahasa and immersed himself in the daily life of the city from which he drew his inspiration. Born 1950, Ibe, Bandundu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo and seen rightly as a “painter reporter” of city life, Moke was among the leading artists of the school of popular painting that sprung up in Kinshasa in the first decade of Zaïre’s independence. He arrived in Kinshasa at the age of ten, living hand to mouth and day by day. Discovering that there was a market for paintings, he taught himself how to render landscapes on discarded pieces of cardboard. In 1965 he painted a picture representing General Mobutu waving to the crowds as he led the parade commemorating Independence Day; this composition, which he returned to many times in later years, launched Moke’s career. He set up a studio at the crossroads of Kasa Vubu and Bolobo avenues, the district where many billboard and advertising artists worked, and immersed himself in the daily life of the city from which he drew his inspiration.

Monsengwo Kejwamfi, called Moke
Monsengwo Kejwamfi, called Moke
 
Moke_Untitled
Moke_Untitled
 
    1  2  3  4   >
PRINTSEND TO A FRIENDTOP OF PAGE
BOUTIQUE HOTELS
CALENDAR
NEWSLETTER


North Face Sale