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Gerda Taro : A revolutionary photographer in the Spain’s war
Gerda Taro
A revolutionary photographer in the Spain’s war
Irme Schaber + Philippe Lewandowski, December 3, 2007
Gerda Taro and Robert Capa_Fred Stein
Gerda Taro and Robert Capa_Fred Stein
 
Taro’s photographs of the war are a striking but little-known record of an important moment in the history of war photography. They are also evidence of the changing possibilities for women in Europe in the 1930s, through Taro’s personal narrative as well as her photographs of female militia members in Barcelona and Valencia. Taro was the first woman known to have photographed in the heat of battle, and the first to die in action. Though Taro’s promising career was cut short, she produced a body of work that is notable for its animation, commitment, and formal experimentation. The exhibition is drawn from ICP’s extensive Taro archive, which includes approximately 200 vintage prints, original negatives, publications, and ephemera. Gerda Taro (Gerda Taro (1910-1937) was a pioneering photojournalist who spent her brief but dramatic career photographing on the front lines of the Spanish Civil War ) was born Gerda Pohorylle, daughter of a liberal Polish Jewish family in Stuttgart, Germany. The family moved to Leipzig when Gerda was nineteen, where the growing strength of the National Socialists and a new circle of friends drew her into involvement in local leftist organizations. In 1933, she was arrested for participating in an anti-Nazi protest campaign. Eventually realizing that it was too dangerous for her to remain in Germany, she left for Paris.

Gerda Taro by Robert Capa
Gerda Taro by Robert Capa
 
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